October 20: International Observe the Moon Night

International Observe the Moon Night, October 20, 2018

 

UPDATE: Saturday, October 20 — Tonight’s scheduled Open Night and local International Observe the Moon Night event is CANCELED. Weather again spoils our plans with showers and thunderstorms prowling the area, and tonight’s impending Wind Advisory keeping our dome closed. While weather is going to keep us indoors tonight, NASA has other suggestions on how you can observe and enjoy Earth’s Moon tonight and later! Take a look: Ten Ways to Observe the Moon, Some Can be Done Any Time

UPDATE: We are closely watching weather forecasts and, as so often has been the case this year, our Saturday night program appears in jeopardy with the possibility of rain and/or snow predicted. Check back here and watch our Twitter feed for further updates and a final go/no-go decision on our October 20 event.

Members of the public are invited to celebrate International Observe the Moon Night on Saturday, Oct. 20 from 7:00 to 9:00. The free event will be held at Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College.

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public event that encourages observation, appreciation and understanding of our Moon and its connection to NASA planetary science and exploration. The annual event connects scientists, educators, and lunar enthusiasts from around the world.

The Hiram event will (given clear skies) include amazing views of Earth’s Moon using the Observatory’s 1901 vintage telescope. If sky conditions allow, other wonders of the night sky will also be sought.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

July 21 Open Night: Moon, Jupiter, and Saturn!

Image: Saturn and a few moons as it will appear the night of July 21. Simulation by "Gas Giants."
Saturn and a few moons as they will appear the night of July 21. Simulation by “Gas Giants.”

 

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, July 21, from 9:30 to 11:00 PM. Given good skies, visitors will see wonderful views of the Moon, giant planet Jupiter with moons of its own, and the “ring world” Saturn. Other objects of interest, such as star clusters, will also be sought, using the Observatory’s vintage telescope.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

 

Image: Jupiter and moon Io as they will appear at about 10 PM on July 21, 2018. The Great Red Spot will be front-and-center. Image: Gas Giants simulation.
Jupiter and moon Io as they will appear at about 10 PM on July 21, 2018. The Great Red Spot will be front-and-center. Image: Gas Giants simulation.

Closed for the season

Photo: Stephens Memorial Observatory- February 2018
Stephens Memorial Observatory – February 2018

Stephens Memorial Observatory is closed for the season. If we enjoy a stretch of clear nights this winter, we may open for a special Open Night event (we would love to show you the Orion Nebula) so watch this website and our Twitter feed for updates. Otherwise, we’ll hope to reopen in March for monthly sessions.

We Wish You Peace and Happiness

Photo: "Solstice Skies over Stephens" Photo by David Dreimiller.
“Solstice Skies over Stephens” Photo by David Dreimiller. While it’s not actually solstice quite yet, the low sun and cloudy skies certainly go with the season!

 

The date of our final scheduled observatory Open Night has passed and Stephens Memorial Observatory will close for the season. If we enjoy a stretch of clear nights this winter, we may open for a special Open Night event (we would love to show you the Orion Nebula) so watch this website and our Twitter feed for updates. Otherwise, we’ll hope to reopen in March for monthly sessions. Until then, we wish you a happy holiday season and a new year full of peace and happiness.

StarLab public programs Friday, December 15

Photo: StarLab Portable Planetarium
StarLab Portable Planetarium

 
We expect we will cancel our scheduled Friday night Observatory event due to cloudy skies and possible snow. There is, however, a special treat awaiting sky-watchers on campus and it’s indoors, you know, where it’s warm!

The portable StarLab planetarium will be set up and open to the public! Free of charge! No tickets required! Folks can just come any time from 7:00 to 9:00 PM. The more the merrier. We will run 20-minute programs in the dome and have a few things planned while people are waiting or as they leave.

The StarLab will be set up in the Gerstacker science building on the Hiram College campus, not far north of the Post Office: 11700 Dean St.; Hiram.

So, come on out and enjoy a fun and informative evening snug inside StarLab. And to everyone we wish a happy holiday season, as well as peace and happiness in the coming new year!

Open Night: Friday, December 15

Photo: The Pleiades
The Pleiades (M45) – By Rawastrodata

UPDATE: Due to inclement winter weather conditions, we expect we will CANCEL this planned event. Skies are predicted to be cloudy with a high likelihood of snow, and temperatures in the 20s can be expected.

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Friday, December 15, from 7:00 to 9:00 PM. Given good skies, visitors will see the stars of the Pleiades and Hyades clusters. Other objects of interest will also be sought. Most of the Observatory’s Open Nights take place on Saturdays but this special Friday event is in support of a related program on the Hiram campus.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

October 28: International Observe the Moon Night

Photo: Waxing Gibbout Moon. Photo by James Guiilford.
The Waxing Gibbous Moon – Night Before First Quarter

UPDATE: THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED DUE TO CONTINUED AND FORECAST OVERCAST/MOSTLY CLOUDY CONDITIONS. 

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, October 28, from 7:00 to 9:00 PM. That night will feature Hiram’s participation in International Observe the Moon Night, a global event celebrating our nearest neighbor in space. Given good skies, Earth’s Moon will be viewed in spectacular detail via the Observatory’s 1901 telescope. Other objects of interest may also be viewed. Visitors are invited to bring their smart phones or cameras and try lunar photography — it’s harder than you may think!

Cloudy skies at the starting time cancel the event and, in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Spectacular views of Earth’s Moon

Photo: Mare Imbrium region of Earth's Moon. Credit: James Guilford/Stephens Memorial Observatory
Mare Imbrium and Crater Copernicus. Credit: James Guilford/Stephens Memorial Observatory

We hosted our September Open Night as scheduled on the 30th with Earth’s Moon as our primary subject. The sky was (for once) completely clear of clouds and full of stars when we opened the dome for the 9:00 start. In all, 19 folks from small children to senior citizens attended and enjoyed spectacular views of our nearest neighbor in space. Two or three individuals attempted smart phone photography of the Moon with varying degrees of success. We also observed the Andromeda Galaxy and the Perseus Double Cluster. The image above was made just before we closed up and has been corrected for the telescope’s optical “flipping” of the image. Camera used was a Canon EOS 7D equipped with a 50mm lens and held to the telescope’s massive eyepiece. We will look at the Moon again October 28 when we celebrate the annual International Observe the Moon Night. See you then?

September 30: Open Night

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, September 30, from 9:00 to 11:00 PM. Featured that night will be Earth’s Moon, the Andromeda Galaxy, and the Perseus Double Cluster. Other objects of interest may also be viewed. Visitors are invited to bring their smart phones and try lunar photography via our grand century-old telescope! Patience will be a necessity as acquiring good smart phone images through a telescope is more difficult than it might seem!

The night’s observing depends upon clear skies and those have been in short supply this season! Cloudy skies at the starting time cancel the event and, in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Here is a link to a map of the Moon with some of its most visible features labeled. The map may be helpful in figuring out just what it was you photographed, or what you may be able to see through binoculars or a telescope!

A fine day under Sun and Moon

Photo: The partial solar eclipse reaches its maximum at 2:23 PM EDT as viewed from Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio. Photo by James Guilford.
The partial solar eclipse reaches its maximum at 2:23 PM EDT as viewed from Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio

On Monday, August 21 millions gathered along a thin path crossing the United States to watch a total eclipse of the Sun, the first to cross the continent since June 1918. Those with favorable viewing conditions along the path of totality enjoyed a truly amazing sight and experience; a total solar eclipse is truly awe-inspiring. From Northern Ohio, outside of the eclipse path, 80 percent of the solar disk would be covered by the Moon. Public interest in the event was high and so we hosted the Hiram Eclipse Watch

 

Photo: People Watching and Waiting for the Big Event - Credit: James Guilford
Watching and Waiting for the Big Event – Credit: James Guilford

We estimate at least 375 people came to the campus lawn to share nature’s show and enjoy the sight together. Some families brought blankets and had picnic lunch in the shade of trees while waiting for the eclipse to begin. Driven by media reports, demand for Sun-safe eclipse viewing glasses was tremendous. Hiram had 300 eclipse viewers available for free distribution and even with restriction to one viewer per family or group, we ran out of glasses long before the eclipse ended. The offer of free eclipse glasses did, however, encourage some of our attendees to come out to Hiram College and discover there was more to enjoy than a giveaway; the view through our telescopes was tremendous.

Photo: Woman watches eclipse through specially-equipped telescope. Credit: Dave Dreimiller
Woman watches eclipse through specially-equipped telescope. Credit: Dave Dreimiller

Three telescopes offered safe views of the eclipsing Sun three different ways. One scope employed a glass filter with metal compounds that absorbed the Sun’s dangerous radiation and presented an orange-tinted image. The largest telescope present, a six-inch refractor, was outfitted with a modern version of the Herschel Wedge; that telescope focussed unfiltered light into the wedge which, in turn, deflected all but a small amount of light with a green tint and offered tack-sharp viewing of the disappearing Sun, sunspots, and granulation texture in the solar atmosphere. A third instrument was a telescope specifically made to view the Sun only hydrogen alpha (Ha) light. Ideally, an Hscope will show details of the solar atmosphere invisible to those using other methods, and include solar prominences — geysers of plasma arcing high above the Sun — but none were seen this day.

Photo: Girl Watching the Eclipse with Safety Glasses - Credit: Dave Dreimiller
Watching the Eclipse with Safety Glasses – Credit: Dave Dreimiller

People of all description came and went during the event though most stayed until the maximum eclipse had been reached and the Moon began to recede from Sun. Lines of folks waited patiently to see the telescopic views, even attempting smart phone photos; there were many repeat views, observing the progress of the eclipse with each fresh look. We estimate at more than 375 people came to the campus lawn to share nature’s show and enjoy the sight together.

Photo: Solar Telescopes Trained on the Eclipse - Credit: Dave Dreimiller
Solar Telescopes Trained on the Eclipse – Credit: Dave Dreimiller

There was learning, and laughter, and a fine day shared under Sun and Moon. It may not have been a total eclipse for those watching from Hiram College, but it was a total pleasure.

Photo: Sun in process of being eclipsed by Moon. August 21, 2017. Photo by James Guilford.
Before Maximum Eclipse – Credit: James Guilford

Cooperative weather plus plenty of happy and excited people made the afternoon a wonderful occasion sharing a fine day featuring a dance by the Sun and Moon.

Photo: Edge of lunar silhouette shows mountains on Moon. Photo by James Guilford.
Before Maximum – Rough Edge. Look closely along the dark curve of the Moon moving over the Sun and note “bumps” along the edge: the silhouettes of craters and mountains on the Moon.

The (Ravenna) Record-Courier made it front-page news!

Image: The Record-Courier - August 22, 2017 -- Page 1
The Record-Courier – August 22, 2017 — Page 1