Archives For Open Night

Saturn and Moons, July 10, 2019. Simulation via Gas Giants.

 

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will host a Public Night Saturday, August 10, from 9:00 to 11:00 PM. On the observing list are two Stephens favorites: Earth’s Moon, and the Ringed World – Saturn! Other objects of interest may also be viewed using the Observatory’s 1901 vintage telescope. Given good viewing conditions the telescope delivers outstanding detail of the Moon and impressive views of Saturn and distinctive rings.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event in which case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Updates on programming are available via the Observatory’s Twitter feed: @StephensObs or its website: StephensObservatory.org.

Our 2019 Schedule

StephensAstro —  July 13, 2019 — Leave a comment

Personal, atmospheric, and astronomic factors have played havoc with planning our 2019 public observing schedule. We have, however, finally posted a list of Open Nights for the remainder of the year; it includes a special night and time in December in an effort to show off the Great Orion Nebula — something we’ve not done in years!

To view and/or print a copy of the newly-published schedule, CLICK HERE.

Please note that we may make changes as the season progresses. Of course weather plays a dominant factor and cloudy skies can, and often do, cancel scheduled events. Please check this website and our Twitter feed for updates

Keep looking up!

Jupiter and its Galilean Moons as they will appear the night of July 13, 2019. Labels for Ganymede and Io overlap. Simulation via "Gas Giants".

Jupiter and its Galilean Moons as they will appear the night of July 13, 2019. Labels for Ganymede and Io overlap. Simulation via “Gas Giants”.

 

WRAP-UP: We played peek-a-boo through clouds with Moon and Jupiter all evening. When they first became visible from behind neighboring trees, viewing of our Moon and the planet was fair to poor. As time passed and the atmosphere settled down, seeing became better and late visitors were treated to excellent views of Moon and fair to good views of Jupiter with his four Galilean Moons and even the Great Red Spot (GRS). In fact, just before we closed for the night, the GRS showed not just as a thickening in the Southern Equatorial Band but as a definite shape with red coloration! Saturday’s was not the best view we’ve had of Jupiter but in the end, it was pretty good. Thanks to the 34 visitors who came out on a muggy and buggy night to enjoy the sights!

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will host a Public Night Saturday, July 13, from 9:30 to 11:00 PM. On the observing list are two Stephens favorites: Earth’s Moon, and planet Jupiter with its moons. Other objects of interest may also be viewed using the Observatory’s 1901 vintage telescope. Given good viewing conditions, organizers say, the telescope delivers outstanding detail of the Moon and impressive views of Jupiter including, when it’s in position as it will be July 13, the planet’s Great Red Spot feature.

Organizers hope for clear skies since recent weather conditions have made scheduled observing impossible. Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event in which case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Updates on programming are available via the Observatory’s Twitter feed: @StephensObs or its website: StephensObservatory.org.

Photo: "Solstice Skies over Stephens" Photo by David Dreimiller.

“Solstice Skies over Stephens” Photo by David Dreimiller. While it’s not currently solstice, the low sun and cloudy skies certainly go with the season!

Stephens Memorial Observatory is closed for the season. If we enjoy a stretch of clear nights this winter, we may open for a special Open Night event (we would love to show you the Orion Nebula) so watch this website and our Twitter feed for updates. Otherwise, we’ll hope to reopen in March for monthly sessions and for better luck with the nighttime weather in 2019!

Photo: Earth's Moon two days short of Full. Photo by James Guilford.

CANCELED: Skies will remain cloudy through Saturday and into Sunday with a chance of snow showers. Also, streets in Hiram Village have been stripped for resurfacing and present challenges to parking. We can’t catch a break this year, it seems. Tonight’s scheduled Open Night is CANCELED and the observatory WILL NOT be open. — Saturday, Nov. 17.

UPDATE: It appears that, yet again, we will need to cancel our scheduled Open Night event due to sky conditions and weather! We will post a final update here Saturday afternoon regarding the status of the evening’s event. — Friday, Nov. 16.

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will host a Public Night Saturday, November 17, from 7:00 to 9:00 PM. On the observing list are the Moon, the Pleiades and Perseus Double star clusters, a farewell look at Mars, and a possible peek at planet Neptune. Other objects of interest may also be viewed.

Organizers hope for clear skies since several recent events have been canceled or compromised by weather. Visitors will be able to view planetary and celestial objects using the Observatory’s 1901 vintage telescope as well as stunning views of Earth’s Moon.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Updates on programming are available via the Observatory’s Twitter feed: @StephensObs (twitter.com/StephensObs)

International Observe the Moon Night, October 20, 2018

 

UPDATE: Saturday, October 20 — Tonight’s scheduled Open Night and local International Observe the Moon Night event is CANCELED. Weather again spoils our plans with showers and thunderstorms prowling the area, and tonight’s impending Wind Advisory keeping our dome closed. While weather is going to keep us indoors tonight, NASA has other suggestions on how you can observe and enjoy Earth’s Moon tonight and later! Take a look: Ten Ways to Observe the Moon, Some Can be Done Any Time

UPDATE: We are closely watching weather forecasts and, as so often has been the case this year, our Saturday night program appears in jeopardy with the possibility of rain and/or snow predicted. Check back here and watch our Twitter feed for further updates and a final go/no-go decision on our October 20 event.

Members of the public are invited to celebrate International Observe the Moon Night on Saturday, Oct. 20 from 7:00 to 9:00. The free event will be held at Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College.

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public event that encourages observation, appreciation and understanding of our Moon and its connection to NASA planetary science and exploration. The annual event connects scientists, educators, and lunar enthusiasts from around the world.

The Hiram event will (given clear skies) include amazing views of Earth’s Moon using the Observatory’s 1901 vintage telescope. If sky conditions allow, other wonders of the night sky will also be sought.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

UPDATE: 8:30 PM — CLOSED. We give up! 😕Although some clearing is expected later, skies will not be adequate to our Public Night needs. The observatory will not be open.

UPDATE: 3 PM — Again we struggle with cloudy skies! Predictions for tonight’s sky range from partly- to mostly-cloudy with seeing conditions rated as fair to poor. If we do open for tonight’s scheduled Public Night, we will doubtless offer only a limited program, perhaps only the Moon and Mars; dimmer objects won’t be seen. Please check back this evening or follow our Twitter feed for further updates. https://twitter.com/StephensObs

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, September 22, from 9:00 to 11:00 PM. Organizers are hoping for clear skies in order to provide visitors with views of the Moon, Red Planet Mars, the Andromeda Galaxy, and a star cluster using the Observatory’s vintage telescope. Weather forecasts (September 20) call for partly-cloudy skies and we will hope for clear air between those clouds; our last public viewing endured mostly-clear skies marred by moonlit smoke from California wildfires high in the atmosphere!

Sadly, a comet, originally expected to be visible, has moved below our horizon and will not be on our agenda.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.