UPDATE: 8:30 PM — CLOSED. We give up! 😕Although some clearing is expected later, skies will not be adequate to our Public Night needs. The observatory will not be open.

UPDATE: 3 PM — Again we struggle with cloudy skies! Predictions for tonight’s sky range from partly- to mostly-cloudy with seeing conditions rated as fair to poor. If we do open for tonight’s scheduled Public Night, we will doubtless offer only a limited program, perhaps only the Moon and Mars; dimmer objects won’t be seen. Please check back this evening or follow our Twitter feed for further updates. https://twitter.com/StephensObs

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, September 22, from 9:00 to 11:00 PM. Organizers are hoping for clear skies in order to provide visitors with views of the Moon, Red Planet Mars, the Andromeda Galaxy, and a star cluster using the Observatory’s vintage telescope. Weather forecasts (September 20) call for partly-cloudy skies and we will hope for clear air between those clouds; our last public viewing endured mostly-clear skies marred by moonlit smoke from California wildfires high in the atmosphere!

Sadly, a comet, originally expected to be visible, has moved below our horizon and will not be on our agenda.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Saving the Dark

StephensAstro —  September 2, 2018 — Leave a comment
Photo: The night sky could look like this anywhere in Ohio if we would just be careful with artificial light. Image Credit: "Saving the Dark"

The night sky could look like this anywhere in Ohio if we would just be careful with artificial light. Image Credit: “Saving the Dark”

What do we lose when we lose sight of the stars? Excessive and improper lighting robs us of our night skies, disrupts our sleep patterns, and endangers nocturnal habitats. Saving the Dark explores the need to preserve or restore night skies and what we can all do to combat light pollution. This film will be shown October 5 & 6 at the Chagrin Documentary Film Festival

Click here for more information and to view the film’s trailer.

Illustration: Saturn and Some Moons as they will appear at 10 PM, August 18, 2018. Simulation by Gas Giants.

Saturn and Some Moons as they will appear at 10 PM, August 18, 2018. Simulation by Gas Giants.

UPDATE: Thank you to the 38 folks who came out to visit us tonight and enjoy the view – such as it was! Early arrivals had exquisite views of Earth’s Moon; then nice views of Saturn with pastel cloud bands across the planetary body and the Cassini Division visible. Late comers got respectable views of Mars though the Martian dust storm hid details! Unfortunately, atmospheric haze/clouds hid the northern sky from us preventing views of the night’s comet and other wonders. Thanks for your patience, kind visitors, and we will hope for truly clear skies in September!

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, August 18, from 9:00 to 11:00 PM. Organizers are hoping for clear skies in order to provide visitors with wonderful views of the Moon, Red Planet Mars, and the “ring world” Saturn using the Observatory’s vintage telescope. With clear enough skies, and a little luck finding it, viewers may also have the opportunity to view Comet 21P/Giacobini–Zinner which is currently dim and with only the hint of a tail.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Image: Saturn and a few moons as it will appear the night of July 21. Simulation by "Gas Giants."

Saturn and a few moons as they will appear the night of July 21. Simulation by “Gas Giants.”

 

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, July 21, from 9:30 to 11:00 PM. Given good skies, visitors will see wonderful views of the Moon, giant planet Jupiter with moons of its own, and the “ring world” Saturn. Other objects of interest, such as star clusters, will also be sought, using the Observatory’s vintage telescope.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

 

Image: Jupiter and moon Io as they will appear at about 10 PM on July 21, 2018. The Great Red Spot will be front-and-center. Image: Gas Giants simulation.

Jupiter and moon Io as they will appear at about 10 PM on July 21, 2018. The Great Red Spot will be front-and-center. Image: Gas Giants simulation.

FINAL — 8:59 PM: Event canceled due to near-Overcast conditions and nearby rain showers. We will try again in July.

UPDATE – June 23, 4:00 PM: Sky conditions are very changeable but prospects look generally poor for tonight’s scheduled Open Night as clouds dominate and isolated showers roam the region. We will make a final go/no-go decision this evening and announce it here and via Twitter.

Stephens Memorial Observatory of Hiram College will be open for public observing Saturday, June 23, from 9:00 to 11:00 PM. Given good skies, visitors will see wonderful views of the Moon and giant planet Jupiter with moons of its own. Other objects of interest, such as star clusters, will also be sought, using the Observatory’s vintage telescope.

Jupiter and Moons - June 23, 2018, 10 PM - Simulated View

Jupiter and Moons – June 23, 2018, 10 PM – Simulated View

The June event represents a late start to our public outreach season caused by an operational problem with the observatory building constructed in 1939. The problem has been corrected and we hope to present a full season’s schedule of public events.

Cloudy skies at the scheduled starting time cancel the event and in that case, the observatory will not open. No reservations are required and there is no admission fee for observatory public nights.

The Observatory is located on Wakefield Road (Rt. 82) less than a quarter of a mile west of Route 700 in Hiram. There is no parking at the Observatory. Visitors may park on permissible side streets near the Post Office, a short distance east of the observatory.

Opening soon?

StephensAstro —  April 24, 2018 — Leave a comment

We normally re-open from our winter break in March or at latest, April. You may have noticed clear or clear-ish nights have been fairly rare and the trend continues so we have not yet scheduled anything for 2018. We will endeavor to begin our public observing events in May though now we are encountering issues with our old building. Weather? Building? It’s always something! Stay tuned here and via Twitter for program announcements and we will hope for the best.

Photo: Stephens Memorial Observatory- February 2018

Stephens Memorial Observatory – February 2018

Stephens Memorial Observatory is closed for the season. If we enjoy a stretch of clear nights this winter, we may open for a special Open Night event (we would love to show you the Orion Nebula) so watch this website and our Twitter feed for updates. Otherwise, we’ll hope to reopen in March for monthly sessions.