Tonight’s Moon deserves a look

StephensAstro —  November 13, 2016 — Leave a comment
Photo: Nearly Full Perigee (aka "supermoon")  - November 13, 2016, 5:52 PM. Photo by James Guilford.

Shortly After Rising: Nearly Full Perigee (aka “supermoon”) Moon – November 13, 2016, 5:52 PM

We’ve said it before, usually too much is made of so-called “supermoon” occasions; they happen with fair regularity and have little astronomical significance, and an astrologer invented the term.

Supermoons are also known as perigee Full Moons — times when Earth’s Moon reaches its full phase and the low point in its orbit (closest to Earth) at the same time. Our Moon is on an elliptical orbit that carries it nearer and farther from Earth, the distance constantly changing as it travels along its path. Perigee Full Moons, because they are somewhat closer to Earth, mean the Moon looks bigger, brighter, and will have an increased influence on ocean tides.

Tonight’s Full Moon, however, may just deserve the supermoon moniker: it will be the closest Full Moon since 1948, floating 221,524 miles (356,509 km) away. We won’t have another perigee Full Moon so close until 2034.

Technically, the Moon reaches perigee (low point in an orbit) tomorrow morning. According to an article from NASA, “The biggest and brightest Moon for observers in the United States will be on Monday morning just before dawn. On Monday, Nov. 14, the moon is at perigee at 6:22 a.m. EST and “opposite” the sun for the full moon at 8:52 a.m. EST (after moonset for most of the US).” The farthest our Moon traveled from us this year was to an apogee (high point of orbit) of 252,688 miles on October 31.

Tonight’s Moon will be brilliant, as it is every time it reaches Full, but many folks won’t really notice the 14 percent larger appearance and 30 percent difference in brightness. Still, the interest is good and our amazing and beautiful nearest neighbor in space deserves the appreciation!

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Director - Stephens Memorial Observatory

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