Solar Eclipse: 2017

Photo: This photo shows the March 2016 solar eclipse as seen from South Tangerang, Indonesia. Credit: Photo copyright Ridwan Arifiandi; Creative Commons license CC BY-NC 2.0

This photo shows the March 2016 solar eclipse as seen from South Tangerang, Indonesia.
Credit: Photo copyright Ridwan Arifiandi; Creative Commons license CC BY-NC 2.0


Join us at Hiram College for viewing of the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017.

The eclipse itself will take place from 1:07 PM – 3:52 PM local time. The narrow path where the total eclipse is visible will cross the continental United States from the Pacific Northwest to the Atlantic. While Ohio sits outside the path of totality, we will experience a deep partial solar eclipse. At maximum, more than 80 percent of the Sun’s disk will be covered (eclipsed) by our Moon, as seen from Northeastern Ohio. Maximum eclipse will be reached at about 2:30 PM EDT in our area.

Photo: The partially eclipsed Sun, photographed through a telephoto lens capped with a special-purpose solar filter. The Moon covers 83% of the Sun's diameter and about 79% of its area. Dark sunspots speckle the solar crescent. Credit: Rick Fienberg / TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel

The partially-eclipsed Sun, photographed through a telephoto lens capped with a special-purpose solar filter. The Moon covers 83% of the Sun’s diameter and about 79% of its area. Dark sunspots speckle the solar crescent. Credit: Rick Fienberg / TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel



Through our telescopes viewers will be able to see the Moon’s silhouette as it steadily covers and then uncovers the Sun. Looking at the edge of that silhouette through the scopes, we expect to be able to make out dips and peaks where lunar mountains and craters lie. Looking at the Sun, we hope to see traces of its roiling surface and, with a specialized solar telescope, observe prominences — geysers of glowing solar material — looping into space. Those using solar eyeglass viewers will see a crescent Sun floating in a darkened sky.

We will strive to make our observing event safe but it is important to note: at no time during the partial eclipse will it be safe to look at the Sun without protection for our eyes! Sunglasses, photo negatives, Compact Discs, etc. are not adequate protection! Here’s a good guide from Sky & Telescope on observing the Sun; it also applies to watching our partial solar eclipse. Unprotected viewing of the Sun, even during this eclipse, can result in permanent eye damage.

Full details are being worked out so please check back here again later; here is what we have so far:

🌙  Our free Hiram Eclipse Watch event will take place on the campus of Hiram College and members of the public of all ages are enthusiastically invited to attend.

🌙  Free eclipse viewing glasses will be available (while supplies last) for safe enjoyment of our amazing Sun.

🌙  Solar-equipped telescopes will provide close-up views of the eclipsing Sun and its atmosphere.

🌙  Hosts will offer descriptions of the eclipse occurrence and be available to answer questions.

🌙  Parking is on nearby streets.

🌙  Indoor restroom facilities will be available.

Not in the Hiram area? Click here to find a viewing event near you!

NOTE: Eclipses are natural phenomena; we cannot change the time, date, or reschedule in the event of poor weather!


A Few Reliable Outside Resources…

American Astronomical Society — Information and advice via this professional astronomers’ site

NASA Eclipse Website — A more technical view of the eclipse

Eclipse-Maps.com — An excellent, detailed map of the solar eclipse path; click on it to magnify

NationalEclipse.com — Offering easy-to-understand information and advice concerning the eclipse

GreatAmericanEclipse.com — Information and advice on where and how to see the eclipse

Eclipse-Maps.com — As the name implies, maps of not only the August eclipse but many others!

NASA: Eclipse Live Streaming — Can’t travel to the eclipse path, can’t join us? Watch “live” via your computer or mobile!

Sky & Telescope Magazine — The venerable publication’s guide to the 2017 solar eclipse